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PROGRAMME DETAILS

Climate Change and the Nigerian Ports System:

A Workshop on Programme Preparedness.

MAY 25-26, 2010

VICTORIA ISLAND, LAGOS.

INTRODUCTION
The warming of the oceans and decline of polar ice sheets is expected to accelerate the rate of sea level rise globally. The effects of sea level rise in most coastal counties will be exacerbated by the sinking of the land surface.

Warming temperatures are likely to increase the costs of transportation construction, maintenance, and operations. More frequent extreme precipitation events may disrupt transportation networks with flooding and visibility problems. Relative sea level rise will make much of the existing infrastructure more prone to frequent or permanent inundation.

Over the coming decades, climate change is likely to cause sea levels to rise, lake levels to drop, more frequent and severe storms, and increases in extreme high temperatures. These effects can have mild to severe impacts on port infrastructure and operations, depending on their geographical setting and design.

Ports are critical to the trade and transportation networks of any nation. Specifically, ports handle a greater portion of foreign trade by weight and value. Over 90% of Nigerian international trade is conducted by sea which flows through the Nigerian seaports. In the West African sub-region, Nigeria’s economic and political dominance is hinged on her seaports which currently handle nearly 70% of all seaborne trade in the region. Moreover, the Nigerian seaports, built from the 1950s right up to the postwar reconstruction years of the 1970s and 1980s, represent billions of naira in capital improvements and new investments. Added to the huge influx of foreign direct investment which private sector concessionaires brought to the table when they took over terminal operations in 2006, the Nigerian seaport infrastructure currently represent one huge multinational investment whose loss or damage by climate change impacts will resonate far and wide.

While the risk that climate change poses to ports is yet to be fully calculated, what is clear is that ports need to better understand climate change, how it may impact them, and what they can do to ensure reliable undisrupted services for their customers.

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE WORKSHOP
The purpose of this workshop is to help raise awareness of the effects of climate change, so that ports can work with government, industry and communities to make more informed adaptation decisions. To date, port authorities have more likely addressed climate change in the context of reducing the “carbon footprint” of freight transportation. Commendably, port authorities are increasingly working with their business partners to reduce the carbon and other harmful emissions from marine vessels, cargo handling equipment, trucks, and trains.

However, most ports do not appear to be thinking about, let alone actively preparing to address, the effects of climate change. There are several likely reasons for this lack of action. Primarily, ports do not have specific information about either the types of impacts that they can expect on their facilities or the probabilities of different impacts occurring.

Although climate change science is making considerable advances, impact projections are not available below a regional scale. Some ports also believe that climate change does not pose an immediate threat to their facilities. Still, a few ports are beginning to think about how to prepare for climate change. These include the Port of Miami, The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, The Massachusetts Port Authority, the Port of Seattle, Washington, The Port of Corpus Christi, and Georgia Ports Authority, alongside other ports across continents of which Nigeria should not be left out.

Some local, regional, and state governments are also taking action on behalf of ports. Several resources are available to ports as they study their risk from climate change, including both climate projections and prototypical planning models. Two major studies released in the past year have examined the potential impact of climate change on transportation systems, including ports. But the field is largely overwhelmed by a need for more and better data and information. A common finding across many studies on the topic is that there is a clear need for further research.

TOPICS:
Some relevant topics that would be presented include:

  • Dealing with Climate Change: Change Detection, Mitigation and Adaptation – Prof. A. S. Omojola.
  • Effects of Global Warming on Ports – Dr. Feyi Oni
  • Effects of Precipitation Levels and Patterns on Marine Structures – Mr C. Y. Okoloye.
  • Patterns of Relative Sea Level Rise and Attendant Effects – Prof P. C. Nwilo
  • Climate Impacts on Freight Transport – Dr Ege Emmanuel.
  • Water Quality versus Marine Facilities and Waterways: Buoys, Lighterage, etc – Dr Charles Asenime.
  • Climate Change Impacts on Transportation Modes – Dr C. Ibe.
  • Sediment Erosion, Accretion and Transport - Prof S. I. Oni.
  • Modelling Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Environments by Dr Shakiru Odunuga.
  • Keynote Address – Climate Change Impacts: The Role Of Stakeholders In The Port Industry - MD NPA.
  • Emergency Preparedness Programme of Nigerian Ports Authority – Surveyor O Omotosho.
  • Opening Speech - Preparedness For Climate Change Impacts As A Rapid Response Programme - By The Honourable Minister Of Transport.

 

VENUE : OCEANVIEW RESTAURANTS, EKO HOTEL, VICTORIA ISLAND, LAGOS.

DATE : MAY 25-26, 2010.

TIME : 9:00 AM DAILY.

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

* Top- and middle-level officers of Nigerian Ports Authority, its subsidiaries and joint venture partners;
* Mid-level Managers,
* Supervisors and Most Staff at Terminals;
* Transport Management Officers, CILT Members and Masters holders in Transport Studies;
* Terminal and Port Operators, Developers, Investors and their key staff; Port facility security officers;
* Terminal security officers;
* Makers, Vendors and Service Providers of leading-edge port operation gadgets and equipment;
* Shipping company security officers;
* Freight Forwarders and Cargo Consolidators; Bankers, Insurance Brokers, Loss Adjusters and Finance organization staff;
* Logistics and Transport Workers.
* Maritime and Port industry union staff and officials;
* Environmentalists and EIA experts in public and private sectors;
* Maritime Schools and Faculty Staff of Transport Institutions; Etc.

 

ATTENDANCE FEES / SPONSORSHIP CONSIDERATIONS.

Platinum sponsorship N5m

(Can nominate up to 8 delegates to attend the workshop; Free 1 page coloured advert in Workshop Brochure; To be named as official sponsor in all pre-workshop newspaper adverts; Sponsor can deliver a short video or Powerpoint presentation to the audience; Sponsor can display podium banner adverts at the event venue; A table with 2 chairs at the registration desk of the event; Delegates to enjoy boat ride to interesting developments around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Ports; Delegates to receive Branded Climate Change Wrist watches; A free one-year subscription of Dredge, Drill & Haul Quarterly Magazine, and Certificate of Attendance.)

 

Diamond Sponsorship N3.5m

(Can nominate up to 5 delegates to attend the workshop; free ½-page coloured advert in Workshop Brochure; to be named as official sponsor in all pre-workshop newspaper adverts; Sponsor can deliver a short video or Powerpoint presentation to the audience; sponsor can display 3 side banner adverts at the event venue; a table with 1 chair at the registration desk of the event; delegates to enjoy boat ride to interesting developments around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Ports; delegates to receive Branded Climate Change Wrist Watches; and free one-year subscription to Dredge, Drill & Haul Quarterly Magazine and Certificate of Attendance..)

 

Gold Sponsorship N2m.

(Can nominate up to 3 delegates to attend the workshop; free 1/4-page coloured advert in Workshop Brochure; to be named as official sponsor in all pre-workshop newspaper adverts; Sponsor can deliver a short video or Powerpoint presentation to the audience; sponsor can display 2 side banner adverts at the event venue; a table with 1 chair at the registration desk of the event; delegates to enjoy boat ride to interesting developments around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Ports; delegates to receive Branded Climate Change Executive Table Clocks and Certificate of Attendance.)

 

Silver Sponsorship N1m.

(Can nominate up to 2 delegates to attend the workshop; to be named as official sponsor in all pre-workshop newspaper adverts; sponsor can display 1 side banner advert at the event venue; delegates to enjoy boat ride to interesting developments around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Ports; delegates to receive Branded Climate Change Executive Table clocks and Certificate of Attendance.)

 

Bronze sponsorship N750,000.00.

(Can nominate up to 2 delegates to attend the workshop; to be named as official sponsor in all pre-workshop newspaper adverts; delegates to enjoy boat ride to interesting developments around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Ports and Certificate of Attendance.)

 

Other participants N100,000.00 each.

Individual attendants will receive all workshop materials, shirts, bags and caps and Certificates of Attendance. They will also be eligible to enjoy the boat ride around Apapa Quays and Tin Can Island Port.

 

Lunch and Tea Breaks will be served all attendants throughout the workshop duration.

(All cheques are made payable to Dredge Skills and Marine Training Centre Ltd. )

 

CONCLUSION
The principal resource for predictions of global climate change is the United Nations Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In its Fourth Assessment Report, published in 2007, the IPCC estimated that global average sea level will rise from 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23.2 inches) by the last decade of the 21st century. The IPCC further concluded that because of global warming, thermal expansion of the oceans will likely continue to increase sea levels for many centuries after greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations in the atmosphere have stabilized.

Consequently, these predictions are adequate for long-term projections of impact on ports at a global scale. A January 2008 study for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) analyzed how climate change could affect the exposure of the world’s 136 largest port cities to coastal flooding due to storm surge by the 2070s. The study took into account the anticipated effects of climate change (sea-level rise and increased storm intensity) as well as worldwide economic and population growth projections. When the cities are considered as a group, there is near certainty (99.9% chance) that at least one of them will be affected by in a 1- in-100 year flood event in any given five year period.

These predictions indicate that several port cities have a high risk of adverse impacts from climate change, but they do not consider that these cities and their ports may implement particular adaptation measures.

Likely patterns of future climate change and sea level rise vary regionally within the country. The Atlantic and Gulf Coasts are at particular risk from sea level rise because of their low-lying topographies and patterns of land subsidence.

Therefore, this calls for high level of preparedness for port cities of which Nigeria has Lagos, Calabar, Port Harcourt, and Warri, amongst others.

 

FOR ALL ENQUIRIES, please contact:

The Coordinator,
(Workshop on Climate Change and the Nigerian Ports System,)
Dredge Skills and Marine Training Centre Ltd,
E.187, Ikota Shopping Complex, VGC,
P O Box 37, Aja.
Lagos Nigeria.

Tel: +234 1 7928166; 08033378735.

Email: editor@ddhmag.com

Website: www.ddhmag.com.